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corporations to pay their fair share. we voted on an approach that puts our economy first and foremost and makes sure that we are protecting, not threatening our fragile economic recovery. that is the kind of approach that is supported by the vast majority of the american people and the senate stood strongly behind that. mr. president, the senate strongly rejected the budget that passed the house of representatives yesterday. their budget would meet the goal by balancing by an arbitrary date but would do it in a way that would be devastating for our families and the economy, dismantling medicare and ending up cutting taxes for the rich while raising them on the middle class. and not only that, but it did rely on gimmicks and tricks to hit that arbitrary date. there is nothing balanced about that kind of approach, and i'm very glad that every member of the senate had an opportunity to be clear about where we stand on that. mr. president, the senate also voted yesterday to specifically reject the idea that medicare should be dismantled or voucherrized. i'm glad we had strong bipartisan s
and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. a great show for you today. first up, the question for the economy. should we save or should we spend? what will get the economy moving faster? i'll talk to the chief proponent of spending. nobel prize winning economist paul krugman. then, the race for space. is america losing? china is building its own space station and the u.s. has to rely on russia to send our astronauts up to the stars. what is going on? >>> and the exploding middle class. in more than seven years it will triple in size to almost 2 billion people. it will change the world. we'll talk about how. >>> but, first, here's my take. those of you who follow the show reg lerly know i have long argued that cutting government spending in the midst of a weak recovery is not a path towards growth. but i have also argued that america does have a debt and deficit problem and we need to take it very seriously. the fact is, the vast majority of our debt problems relate to the costs of health care in america. now that the debate over obama care is over, we should start thinking about how to get am
to be fiscally responsible and reduce the deficit. to make velft to grow our economy and to meet our obligation to our seniors, to our families and to our future and the republican budget fails all three. republican budget threatens our nation by undermining our economic growth and by shifting the financial burden for the deficit, and the deficit reduction, to our seniors and the middle class. republicans have made their choices clear, end medicare as we know it, adding costs to seniors today and ending the medicare guarantee tomorrow, slashing investments necessary for economic competitiveness and giving millionaires an average of $400,000 in tax breaks. republican budget eliminates protection for millions of our sickest seniors who depend on nursing home and home health services and republican budget will increase taxes for average middle-class families by $3,000. their choices will cost two million jobs next year alone and decrease economic growth by 1.7%. in contrast, the democratic alternative present serves -- preserves the medicare guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation
it is important to realize that it is possible to make investments in our economy today, create jobs, repeal the sequester, and still reduce our deficit in a responsible and laled way. -- and balanced way. in closing i urge my colleagues not to be scared by the rhetoric that sometimes we hear. instead, i urge my colleagues to support one of the multiple budget proposals that reduce our deficit responsibly while creating jobs today and protecting the important programs like medicaid and medicare for generations to come. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back her time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. woodall: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i thank the gentlelady for being with me on the floor today. i'll say that we sometimes have some controversy in the rules committee, mr. speaker. there is a lot of responsibility that lies in the rules committee. with 435 folks here in this chamber. we all would like to have our say. we'd all like to have our say probably more than once. and the rules committee's tasked wi
reserve's two day meeting on the economy wraps up. that begins at 2:30 eastern time. >> coming up, the head of immigration and customs enforcement testifies about the release of nearly 2000 immigrants because of budget constraints. the 2014 budget plan put out by chairman paul ryan would balance the budget in 10 years and put in place medicare changes. the chamber should finish work on boating on the measure on wednesday. here is tuesday's debate. mr. ryan: i bring forward and present the budget resolution for the fiscal year 2014. we believe that we owe the american people a responsible balanced budget and that is precisely what we are bringing to the floor today. our budget balances the budget within 10 years and it does so without raising taxes. balancing the budget will help us foster a healthier economy, it will help us create jobs. in fact, two leading economists released a study analyzing our budget and its positive effects on the economy and jobs. in the first year they said it would, quote, boost the economy immediately, increasing both of our economy by a whole percentag
the economy grow more and more jobs be created because we have had the slowest recovery during this recession since any time after the world war ii, at least. very, very slow. but we have done something to a degree we have never done before, and that is borrow and spend to stimulate the economy. and someone has compared borrowing and spending to stimulate the economy to the idea of someone taking a bucket, scooping up water in one end of the swimming pool and pouring it into the other. you have got no net gain. the truth is you lose some of the water out of the bucket as you walk along the shore. in this case what we lose is, we lose interest on that debt indefinitely because there's no plan to pay down the debt. so this budget that's before us today does not balance, it does not put us on a sound path, it does not create confidence in the -- among the american citizens that the future is going to be sound, that we've gotten this country reoriented in a way that's going to produce long-term growth. indeed, it's going to do exactly the opposite. it's going to do exactly the opposite. it's goin
we all want to go. wwe want to have a growing economy, weal we want to deal with our deficit. these are challenging, complex goals. we can get there. even the action of this body last night in passing the fyn.2013 appropriations bill shows we can cooperate together and with the thousands get there. it is my hope that that will inspire us going forward. the question is this: we all agree that what has been done thus far in the area of deficit reduction equates to about $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction that has been done by the last congress, including the deal on the bush tax cuts that were made at year end. $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction over the next ten years. and all also agree that $is.8is- that $1.8 trillion was gutting expenses and a little more than $600 billion of this was revenues achieved through the year-end bush tax cut deal. so everwhelmingly what has been done thus far has been in spending cuts rather than new revenues. it is very important for us to know that. it is very important for folks to realize that democrats are willing to make are hard calls abo
to the sequester republicans will not replace. just as the economy is improving for our neighbors and small businesses back home. in contrast, the democratic alternative will cren rate 1.2 million more job, stop the sequester and in committee, democrats proposed to close those special interest tax loopholes that riddle our tax code, republicans said no. democrats proposed to offset unwise republican cuts to medical research like alzheimer's, cancer, diabetes research at n.i.h., republicans said no. democrats tried to cut the special interest spending in the tax code to offset republican cuts to students who rely on pell grants but republicans said no. mr. van hollen: i yield the gentleman another minute and a half. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. ms. castor: the democrats in the budget committee proposed to strengthen medicare and replace the republican plan to turn medicare into a voucher program. all it does is simply shift the cost tour families and older neighbors. mr. speaker, this republican budget is not consistent with american values. it is not fiscally responsible. it is a
this. gallup, fox news, rasmussen, after the economy, the number two concern to the people is the debt. i think there is a growing sense that government spending and government debt at these levels, it does act as a huge drag on the economy. connell: what we have been saying here, unless the interest rates start to go up, you can pull people and they can say whatever they want. their behavior will not change unless you see a spike in interest rates. >> it will be hard to get a spike in interest rates with the fed flooding the system with liquidity. the whole world is on painkillers right now. we have become addicted to liquidity, easy solutions and until the fed start to bring it in and interest rates go up, i do not see a change. dagen: do the people who are still buying taxable debt, you start to see money flowing back into u.s. stock. you see billions every week into world stock. >> i think we are somewhere close to the end of a bond bubble. for the third time in 60 years, we are looking at ten year treasury rates below inflation. that is, obviously, not a way to build over time. we
earnings cycle. also in this environment the u.s. economy is growing more like 2% and a lot less like 4 in that environment pricing is going to be challenged and the top line sales is not going to be universal for all firms. it will be balance sheet by balance sheet and case by case. security collection becomes far more important. >> i was going to say as you point out the profit growth picture has been pretty good but we are getting at the mature point in that cycle and the forecast is about 1% or 2% overall growth. there are always ways to make more money than the index tracking would lead you to believe. where do you think the pockets of possible better than average profits would be? >> so we do like equities. when you compare that to fixed income certainly in government space so we like equities and we like global equities. it will have to be a multi asset strategy which is kind of all of the above. looking at commodities and debt and equities and looking in companies in europe. there are good companies with strong balance sheets in europe, as well. looking into russia, indonesia, m
a campaign on jobs and the economy, jobbing and the economy, jobs and the economy and beat that drum until i beat people into sleep. that's part of it, all right, but all of the rest of this has to be added together, or we can never reconstruct this country. we will not get the pillars of american exceptionalism back together. [applause] unless we have the full spectrum. if we can restore our families and strengthen our faith and protect innocent, unborn human life instead of assaulting it with a half a billion dollars appropriated to planned parenthood in a single year. that's gotta go. obamacare has got to go. [cheers and applause] we can't let up on obamacare and believe that somehow we're going to capitulate to that side because the roads are vitality, and it is an unconstitutional taking of god-given american liberty, and it's got to go. [cheers and applause] ronald reagan omelet me down a couple -- only let me down a couple of times in eight years. one of those was 1986, and i still had the dent after i heard on the news he had signed the amnesty act of 1986. but it was on the promise
, it adopts the european style austerity approach that we've seen slow down economies in many parts of europe. we should instead be focusing on job growth and putting people back to work rather than a budget like this budget which will result in 750,000 fewer americans working by the end of this year. that's according to the independent nonpartisan congressional budget office. and it will result in more than two million fewer people working next year. it also fails the test of taking a balanced approach. because it is founded on the failed idea that combiffing another round of tax cuts to people at the very high end of the income scale will somehow trickle down and lift up all the other votes. but we know that hasn't worked and yet it is pursued once again such that everybody in e republican is asked to folks at the pt top. we offered, we democrats offered an amendment in the budget committee to say don't increase taxes on middle class americans and all the republican colleagues voted no. it it is based on the idea that we should dramatically cut investments that are important to help our eco
insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of the economy. consider that here in the united states. our banking system is roughly one-time the size of our economy. what we're waiting to see next are they going to get this through parliament and get it done? it is so controversial they're trying to find out different ways to make it less controversial. impose the tax on larger shareholders to a much greater degree. it was originally 9.9% and you go to 12%. if you didn't want to tax the small guys at all you'd have to go to 15% or 16%. this is the scene when the president walked into the palace headquarters. there were people there with no written on their hand and this says merkel stole our money. keep in mind, european union will still give them 10 billion euros and they were trying to come up to reduce the original size from 17 billion euros. the other thing to keep in mind, by taxing depositors they're taxing a lot of foreigners and a lot of russians who had kept their money. the thing is will the rest of europe, will small depositors across the rest of europ
, the appropriate spending reduction so we can try to get this economy back on track. excitingt is an activity that is been on the house floor these past two days. we will likely pass that out of the house of representatives today. this is a budget by paul ryan that will allow us to get to balance. that means the government will stop sending more money than it takes in by the end of the decade, which is really exciting. what that allows us to do is to get the economy rolling, jobs being created and provide more certainty so young people coming out of college know there is going to be a job in their field. those in the workforce will know they will be needed. those in retirement, social security and medicare and those will be strengthened and security. an exciting time. guest: -- the: when it comes to continued resolution which funds the government through september, did it include sequester cuts that took effect earlier this month? spending atcludes the sequester level. there is flex ability for the military, department of defense and a few other areas that allow money to be moved to areas of
in washington. is something going to get done this year, and would a balanced budget hurt the economy? joining me for debate, the republican wlip in the house, kevin mccarthy, and the top democrat on the budget committee, congressman chris van hollen. >> we'll talk about the future of the republican party, and >> we'll talk about the future of the republican party, and republican governor scott walker for those nights when it's more than a bad dream, be ready. for the times you need to double-check the temperature on the thermometer, be ready. for high fever, nothing works faster or lasts longer. be ready with children's motrin. like a squirrel stashes nuts, you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec® liquid gels. nothing starts working faster than zyrtec® at relieving your allergy symptoms for 24 hours. zyrtec®. love the air. >>> on tuesday, the day a new pope was installed in rome, president obama makes a sensitive trip to the holy land for his first presidential trip to israel. the trip isn't ambitious. mostly the president seems to be responding to critics who question why he's n
revenues. it would cut waste, add jobs and spur economic growth of the economy. it would reduce the deficit by an additional $1.8 trillion without jeopardizing the recovery or harming the middle class. it includes $1.2 trillion in new revenue obtained not by tax increases but by closing loopholes and eliminating wasteful spending that benefits the wealthiest americans and the largest corporations. it eliminates $4 billion in annual tax breaks to the oil and gas industry, an industry that is making profits. they don't need a tax break. in fact, they're making enormous profits. so, why does the ryan budget give them a government subsidy? the democratic plan invests in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. it is designed first and foremost to help create jobs and strengthen the economy. the house democratic budget also makes critical investments in our future. $200 billion is invested in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. helping to create jobs and strengthen the economy. these investments include $80 billion for an education jobs initiative, $50 billion
to us that -- quote -- "the need to transform the world's energy economy while addressing global climate change is not only a religious and moral imperative, it is a strategy for security and survival. the united states conference of catholic bishops says that -- and i quote -- "at its core, global climate change is not about economic theory or political platforms, nor about partisan advantage or interest group pressures. it is about the future of god's creation and one human family." the bishops asked congress to consider seven principles in shaping responsible climate change policies. one, addressing global climate change means protecting the common good. two, climate change will hit the most vulnerable communities the hardest. three, we must seek solutions that enhance rather than diminish the economic standing of the poor. four, new resources must be made available to poor communities to adapt to the effects of a changing climate. five, we must protect vulnerable people from the negative human health effects of climate change. six, local affected communities should have a voi
at home, what do we do about our economy so we don't become a cyprus isn't senate passed its first real bottoming proposal in more than four years. but many americans are worried that lawmakers are kicking the can down the road. the majority say they are slightly less nervous about the economy than they were in 2010. an overwhelming number of us think the number-1 challenge to our economy is the continuing, mounting debt. we have a former media spokesperson for george w. bush and a democratic political consultant to hillary clinton for president. mersaides and richard, welcome to both of you. americans are sick of this. look at the debt clock this. thing keeps whizzing up. the debt is mounting. every sunday, i show this. it has gone up another trillions, it seems, theres and multi-millions. mercedes, how do we stop that in its tracks and make it go the other way? >> we can't stop it when you have the budget plan that senator murray has pushed through. 50 of all, because it has such little support from american voters. for example, we saw a poll saying that only 28% of likely voters sup
of the economy is about 18 billion euros, so the banking industry is four times the size of the economy. if you allow the banks to fail, much like letting citibank or jpmorgan here in the united states, that would have significant repercussion the in the economy. connell: where do you stand on the idea of the con cement spreading? could it happen in other countries was the question asked, it seemed like, in the markets this morning if it goes through on cypress, on to the next guy and next who have problems? >> that's a legitimate concern that the architect or one of the principle architects here, the imf, the ecb, and the european union and germany with a strong hand there. if they force this upon one country, who is to say they couldn't force it upon a larger, more important country? if europe were able to execute a plan like that, who is to say that the united states wouldn't look and say, well, they did it in europe, why couldn't we look here? connell: rule of law question; right? >> exactly. dagen: what's the solution? somewhere between forcing the haircut and letting banks fail? where is
and the economy, support for proxies'. if you had the opportunity to sit quietly with the supreme leader of iran and talk to him, talk him out of whatever he appears to be intending to do, what would you say to him about u.s. intentions at u.s. cooperation with our partners in the region? >> i would send dennis rodman over there. [laughter] the truth is the first thing i would do i would ask why they are doing what they're doing and i would like to hear it from him personally. because we know of course what his surrogates and proxy's are doing. i would like to know from him they close by the way, you know in that region that the three countries that have always been country, iran, turkey, egypt, they are the cornerstone of that region. it does not mean that we want to be like them or anyone want to be like them, but we have to account for the fact that those three countries are the historic cornerstones or and points of that region. the first thing i would like to is what is a they believe the future holds for the region and why are they apparently, it seems to me, on a path to try to dredge up
in jobs in the economy, and closes loopholes and preserves the middle class' ability to grow and proceed. so, we now are, you know, in this 30-hour thing. we could actually be debating the budget while those 30 hours tick. we don't have to be sitting here doing nothing. and one of our colleagues said, he'd like to debate the budget two weeks from now. why is he putting things off? well, i guess if i had their budget and looked at it compared to our budget, that's what i'd want to do. but that's not fair and that's not right. so i just came to the floor to join my colleague from washington in pleading with our colleagues, let's have a real debate on the budget. the lines are squarely -- are sharply drawn. our budget and your budget contrast. let the american people hear the debate and decide who they like. we're pretty confident they'd like ours better. you no longer have the talking point, we don't have a budget. so instead you're preventing us from talking about our budget. it is not fair, not right, and doesn't really help the process. so i would hope that i know there are some members
economy and creates good jobs that american people need to support their families. we must balance our budget for our students. those who are currently in our universities and community colleges should feel confident that an investment in their education will lead them to good-paying jobs when they graduate. a balanced budget gives them that confidence that their future will not be threatened by staggering debt. most important we must balance our budget for our children and grandchildren who deserve the same chance of the american dream that we have been given. rather than handing them a bill for this generation's irresponsibility, a balanced budget will allow us to hand them a brighter future, an american future. our budget, a balanced budget, represents a departure from the status quo here in washington and it represents house republicans' commitment to moving our nation forward in a fiscally responsible way. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland, m
to the economy generally to gun control. you know, just on gun control there's been a lot of things that have been happening over just even the past few weeks. i was in colorado a couple weeks ago, and it's the first time i've kind of heard of a white house getting involved in the passage of state legislation where the big news when i was there was, apparently, vice president joe biden had just been calling up members of the state legislature there kind of lobbying them, saying that if they voted the right way, the president would help campaign for them this next year, and if they voted the wrong way, they may end up facing primary opponents. and according to legislators i talked to there, there was about seven democrats who had switched their votes enough to get four gun control bills through the statehouse. so there's a lot of things tar happening right now. -- that are happening right now. but what i'd like to try to start off with is the general issue of health care, because i think we've had the best health care system in the world, and i'm just going to briefly go through some of the ch
of the total economy were over 20%. in this republican fantasy land budgets are balanced with revenues at 19% of the economy, yet meeting the needs of 78 million more seniors and a infrastructure deficit that is growing as america is falling apart. clearly this is not remotely possible if we are going to enjoy anything like our current quality of life. there is a real world intersection of budget saving opportunities with potential areas of agreement. health care reform is one. but not just by shifting the burden to seniors and disabled as the republicans propose in their fantasy budget. my home state of oregon is the middle of an exciting demonstration of how to squeeze out the waste we all know is there and realign incentives. instead of the empty ritual of pretending to repeal obamacare, let's work together to accelerate reform for all americans. if the oregon experiment works, and frankly many of these efeshencies by the way are already achieved in other parts of the country and with some private health systems, we could save more than $1.2 trillion that is the flawed sequester is suppos
of family relationships than by the parents' sexual orientation. >>> coming up, when will the economy be healthy enough to stand on its own? according to fed chief ben bernanke, not for a while. we'll tell you all about it, coming up next. [ bop ] you can do that all you want, i don't like v8 juice. [ male announcer ] how about v8 v-fusion. a full serving of vegetables, a full serving of fruit. but what you taste is the fruit. so even you... could've had a v8. glass on floors. daily chores. for the little mishaps you feel use neosporin to help you heal. it kills germs so you heal four days faster. neosporin. use with band-aid brand bandages. neosporin. i go to angie's list to gauge whether or not the projects will be done in a timely fashion and within budget. angie's list members can tell you which provider is the best in town. you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare. now that we're expecting, i like the fact that i can go onto angie's list and look for pediatricians. the service providers that i've found on angie's list actually have blown me away. join toda
contributes to the local economy, $2.3 billion. so, the effect of the furloughs, as a result of sequestration, how do you expect that to play out? >> well, i can tell you that it's impacting my friends, my neighbors, it's impacting families throughout southern illinois. you're looking at people giving up 20% of their pay, and that's going to have a profound impact on the local economy. you know, those people who aren't getting a full week's pay for a full week's work won't be buying new cars. they certainly won't be buying new houses. and they won't be going down and getting that widescreen tv, or maybe going out to eat. >> right. >> and so, that's going to have a ripple effect throughout the economy. i'd like to point out, too, it's not just scott air force base. you know, we have federal prisons, and -- who are facing furloughs. that's a profound impact not only on the economy but also on the safety of those other prison employees. we have the shawnee national forest, the largest national forest in illinois, very significant impact. >> yeah. well -- >> we're losing three air control towers.
see the economy take off mr. mr. norquist? >> guest: okay, we haven't had trillion dollars spending cuts that we had an agreement by the president of the united states forced on them by the republicans to reduce spending over the next decade by a trillion dollars, so 100 million a year. they haven't started yet and they're just beginning to kick in. this a quest or is an additional $1.2 trillion over the decades to what the republicans want in the state battle we had in 2011, the budget control act was obama needs the debt ceiling to be increased because we spent so much money and republican said okay, we will raise the debt ceiling so the country doesn't default but only if you agree to a dollar for dollar reduction in spending over the next decade. that $2.5 trillion in spending restraints, not real cuts, spending, less than obama had hoped but in washington that is called a cut. if you want 10 of something and you only got eight of something, you walked away with eight but so that was the $2.5 trillion spending reduction over the next decade. it hasn't happened yet. we have sever
, there will have to be budget cuts behind the sequester. the sequester will not be the end of it, but the economy is recovering. i wouldn't say in spite of what the govern am hment has done. the economy is recovering of its own natural forces now. we've had 12 years of subpar growth. we've had 12 years of up and down with little net progress in the markets and people have forgotten what a strong economy and what a bull market -- a secular bull market looks like, and i think that's generally where we're headed for the next four years, so i'm predicting, as you said, 25,000 on the dow which implies a 15% compound rate of return for the next four years. >> john, can i just come back on the important points that you're making about europe. i'm not sure it's a question of what america trades with whom. it's a question of where the companies that are quoted on this market make their profits and in technology, for example, 40% of those profits are made in europe and therefore europe arguably is more significant than you might think on the trade argument having said that. this is a very interesting week
will we see the economy take off, mr. norquist? >> guest: okay. we haven't had a trillion dollar in spending cuts what we had was an agreement by the president of the united states forced on him by the republicans to reduce spending over the next decade by a trillion dollars. so that's $100 billion a year. and those cuts haven't started happening yet. they're just beginning to kick in. the sequester is an additional $1.2 trillion over the decade. so what the republicans won in that big battle we had in 2011, the budget control act, was that obama wanted to keep spending, and he needed the debt ceiling to be increased because he'd spent so much money. and the republicans said, okay, we'll raise the debt ceiling is so the country doesn't default, but only if you agree to a dollar-for-dollar reduction in spending over the next decade. and so we got $2.5 trillion in spending restraint. not real cuts, spending less than obama had hoped in. in washington that's called a cut. if you wanted ten of something and you only got eight of something, you go i got cut too. actually, you walked a
: without knowing the structure of the new bedford economy, it is experiencing what a lot of people are experiencing. depending on the industries, you are a winner or loser depending on the structure of your economy. places that are strong in are growing.ces information sector, utilities. these are areas that have not been growing. host: talk about new england. aest: i grew up outside of town in massachusetts. it has similarities to new bedford. .bout 100,000 people strong industrial heritage. it redefined and re-scope itself successfully over the last couple of decades. massachusetts recognizes that its older cities have these challenges. and i go home to visit, there have been efforts to revitalize the older cities. they have lots of charms. new bedford has a wonderful whaling history. has worked atry sincetizens -- census 1997. we are looking at population changes. our other guest is lisa sturtevant with guest: richey-- where mason university she is a p deputy analysis. let's hear from bob, south dakota, rural. caller: i have some comments. [indiscernible] we should look at our
, in science and research, in education. things that are important to power the economy. our focus has been on jobs first. let's get the economy in full gear. not put the brakes on it. which is what the republicans do. they've gotten austerity budget that according to the nonpartisan congressional budget office, will result in 750,000 fewer jobs bn i end of the year. so we say let's tackle the deficit in a smart way, get people back to work and reduce it over a steady period over a period of time and our comes to balance at the same time that the republicans' budget from last year comes into balance. >> on the issue of revenue, i believe your budget has about $200 billion more in revenue than senator murray's budget in the senate. why did you put that in there considering that republicans are so adverse to any new revenue? >> the budget we have in our democratic proposal. if you take it even together with the revenue from the fiscal cliff agreement, is still less total revenue, luke, than was embedded in the bipartisan simpson-bowles agreement. so we have less revenue proposed by that bipar
, that reagan laid for the incredible ground work of the economy in the 1980's and 1990's. clinton helped to some extent, ut then he created and repealed glass-steagall, and everybody blames it on george bush. the conservatives who didn't do much for the letter peace, we tried to expand under karl rove, the voting process, and giving more to hispanic community, and we didn't get one increase in vote in that eight-year period so. what makes you think that we're going to give amnesty and all the set get a bunch of votes? it's fraud, and it's another really ploy by the democratic party to keep promising and benefits to everybody who will vote for them no matter what. scommoip we're going to talk about immigration in our next segment of the "washington journal" today. but we still have about five minutes left in this segment, if you want to call in to give us your take on this growth and opportunities report that was released today, or if you think hanges in the republican debates would have helped republicans in the 2012 election. a couple of other stories to point out, the front page of the
have the most developed set of economies in western europe that exist and the relationship across the atlantic constitutes nearly one third of world trade. that is why european investment in the u.s. is around eight times that of investment in india and china put together. this basis of its enormous significasignifica nce in today u.s. investment in the e.u. is three times higher than in all of asia so it speaks for itself the potential that exists there. that transatlantic relationship defines the shape of the global economy as well. so it either the e.u. or the u.s. is the largest trade and investment partner from most all of the countries in the global economy that speaks of the centralitcentralit y of the power and the potential for is fair. that is why i am happy from an irish perspective to see the high-level report produced between the e. u. and the u.s. in terms of potential has received a very positive response. i spoke to the president after his re-election and he addressed this matter in his state of the union address and last week the european council gave the theory p
economy. now evidence they might be tanking our economy. you remember solyndra that cost american taxpayers more than $500 million. turns out it may have a successor. >> steve: months after opening, the oregon based solar panel company, solo power, is facing layoffs, putting 250 million of our taxpayer dollars in jeopardy. apparently stuart varney, we learned nothing from solyndra. >> no, we have learned absolutely nothing. the president is now doubling down again on green energy projects. he still believes the government can pick winners in green energy and he still thinks that maybe we'll get the technology right to get green power in the future. wrong on all counts. we're so far failed with these green energy products. i think we've got a list of all the green energy project which is have really gotten into deep trouble, either bankrupt, laid people off, they've lost a ton of money. it's one after another. it's very, very long list. >> steve: what do you think it was about this particular solo power thing that the government said oh, we got to give them a bunch of dough? >> the
austerity we were pushing ruined economies -- it was the dumbest thing we could have asked for. and the real story behind greece being the assumption around the world has been that greece got into a big financial problem. they were paying too many social entitlement payments to their people. they got under it. they borrowed money to cover it and then they got in too deep. and they got the bailout money and somehow it didn't fix it. and you keep hearing we're going to become greece. >> right. >> hal: it's the gdp versus debt idea. which is stupid. you find out the real story behind greece -- which again, not to get too much like lee camp where you start to lose your money and try to remain funny, but at the same time you are like what the hell -- the greece idea is we'll give you this money but you have to cut your social entitlements. we'll give you this but you have to cut these ridiculous entitlement programs. >> entitlement for social protection? >> hal: it was all kinds of stuff like that. unemployment insurance, their equivalent of medical payments -- it
is doing everything we need to do to make sure that we're growing our economy and that we're strengthening our middle class. and as i said in my state of the union address, last month. every day we should be asking ourselves three questions. one, how do we make sure america's a magnet for good jobs. number two, how do we equip people with the skills they need to get those jobs. and number three, how do we make sure that hard work actually pays off in a decent living. these are the challenges that i have instructed my team at the white house and my entire cabinet to focus on. and a position that's instrumental to tackling these challenges is having an outstanding secretary of labor. so, i want to begin by thanking hilda solis and her entire team. including acting secretary seth harris. for the outstanding work that they've been doing over the past four years. their efforts at the department of labor have given more young people a chance to earn new skills. more returning vets the chance to find a job, they've looked out for worker safety from construction sites to coal mines. they stood up
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of micro economy or cottage industry of accessories that is really exploding. what you're seeing is tons of entrepreneurs, investors really thinking that this industry and everything around it could really be the next big growth industry. you have people that really aren't in this for any benefit other than just the financial which is different from i think what we've seen in the past. so it's really fascinating. >> lee, medical marijuana. that's been legal in 18 states but it seems as though the tipping point is this legalization of marijuana in colorado and washington last year. why was that a game changer? >> that's true. that was a breakthrough of an entirely different order. even though it was just two states, what happened there was they basically, two ballot initiatives basically made it legal for use of any kind, medical or whatever, and it also required that states would regulate and license businesses, commercial businesses to be able to sell it and to really regulate it. so basically taxed and regulated the industry. this is much more different than even what is the case in pl
: what does this do for oakland's economy? >> last year the economic impact was about $4 million. we expect it to be a little bit more this year. and also there is always the charity piece. number of charities are involved once again. we expect the race probably in the neighborhood of $400,000 for charity. >> reporter: you've got people coming here taking part in this race from all over the down from industry and the united states. the full marathon is the first race that will kick off here. that will happen a half hour from now at 7:30. we'll be here for that. for now we are live in oakland alex savidge ktvu channel 2 news. >> thanks. we do have more information about the race on our website just two to ktvu.com and click on hot topics. >>> secretary of state john kerry makes a surprise trip to baghdad. kerry has been meeting with the leaders with other middle eastern nations. earlier he traveled to saudi arabia and egypt. last week he accompanied president obama to egypt. this is kerry's first trip to iraq after becoming secretary of state. >>> pope francis celebrated his first pal
to eat and consume. they help the economy and take jobs from no one. you can share your tweets tith us. -- with us. focusingrom reuters, u.s. immigration detention cost. there was much controversy recently about federal officials releasing hundreds of immigrants from detention centers, ahead of the looming budget cuts. the real issue should be the u.s. taxpayer foot as the bill to retain more than 30,000 people every day. not a group of immigrants to pose little threat to public safety were transferred out of federal facilities last week. and he says that should not be the focus. instead the fact that they're being detained should be. she writes whenever the circumstances surrounding the move, the result is barter -- smarter enforcement that could save the government hundreds of thousands based on data from the president's most recent budget request. at some of the numbers here. in the meantime, we will take this call. gabriel, tampa, florida. democrat line. good morning. yes.er: host: what are your thoughts about not as violent illegal immigrants? [inaudible] host: is that adequate? d
really matters to what is happening in europe. cyprus, 0.2% of the euro-zone economy. it's banking sector accounts for mostst economy. what is happening there has wall street's attention because of the precedent it may set for other struggling nations. also, russian business has about $19 billion in cyprus. that's according to mootiedy's. wall street happy with the plan in place right now. it's also the last week of the first quarter. check out your investments this morning. if you haven't looked in a while the you'll be pleased. the s&p 500 is up more than 9% over the first three months of 2013. you can see the rally took off from november of last year. 9% will be a solid return for the entire year. but it's happened only in the first three months of this year. the s&p 500 is up 11% over the past year overall. over and over, when is this going to end? that is nearly impossible to preticket. there is one ratio that wall street looks to and it shows that prices are still fairly valued right now, maybe even cheap at least historically speaking. look at this. this is something that measures
to bob beckel. celebrity apprentice one gets fired and china's emerging economy. they are about to over take us in 2018. ben carson will close the show. he's john hop kens neurosurgeon who may be our next president. see you soon. look what mommy is having. mommy's having a french fry. yes she is, yes she is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100% vegetable juice, with three of your daily vegetable servings in every little bottle. >> good morning. it is 8 minutes before the hour. one time domestic terrorist and friends to the president bill ayers a visiting scholar at minnesota state university. school administrators are not concerned with his radical past. take note for this, you will soon be able to use your tablet and e readers during cakeoffs and landings. they will announce the new policy by the end of the year. cell phones will still not be allowed to be used during kickoff and landing. >> speaking of flying travelers beware. you can be aware you can be a prime target for scammers who want your money. courtney scott is here to let us know what we need to know. thank you
for everybody in our state. that was an amazing challenge when the economy ran into some much difficulty. we had in districts are representative, in the southern part, kokomo, we built chrysler transmissions there and had over 5000 people working, building those transmissions before the troubles it. after the troubles hit, it was almost down to zero. and in the northernmost part, an elkhart county, we countyr.v.'s for the world, and then diesel hit $4 a gallon and credit dried up. then the economy tight end. we had a large number of folks who were wondering how am i going to keep my job, how am i going to pay my mortgage, how am i going to be able to keep my house, the most basic thing. of the things that was designed in our state was to try to train people said that they had more of an ability than just to be working on it and not so skills position, and we set up with our community college system across the state, retraining programs so that they were able to run machines, able to learn advanced manufacturing. and just below the area where the r.v. companies were, was a manufacturinge area, an
would most certainly collapse. that could potentially threaten other national economies. these things are often domino effects as you know. greg palkot is live in london. what is the latest on this deal, greg. >> reporter: you're right, martha. people are scrambling blink to prevent another way for cyprus to go bankrupt and dragging rest of europe down with it. in the cypriot parliament, not a single member of parliament voted in favor of that plan. this plan could see as much as 10% taken out of private bank accounts to help bankroll that bailout. the vote was seen as a victory for the little guy but yes, now they have to find another way of getting the money. one way of getting the money may be go to moscow with hat in hand. cypriot officials were there today. rich russians taking advantage of lax banking regulations on the sigh land of cyprus invest a lot there. maybe as much as half of the deposits and investments are coming from russia. they're looking now for more loans from russia and maybe there are reports of selling off some things there. a bank. a maybe some energy rights.
building. damaging his economy big time pressure on president obama at home all around the world to intervene in some way. carl levin saying saying there should be some kind of surgical air strike. maybe the president should help set up a no-fly zone around syria to pressure assad. the bottom line is the president at a news conference here yesterday said he feels like it's a situation where is he damned if he does, damned if he doesn't. take a listen. >> your question may be suggesting is why haven't we simply gone in militarily? and, you know, i think it's fair to say that the united states often finds itself in a situation where if it goes in militarily, then it's criticized for going in militarily. if it doesn't go in militarily, then people say why aren't you doing something militarily? >> now, there is also the situation i mentioned with the syrian refugees spilling into jordan here. the bottom line is that king abdullah noted that it is now so bad that there is one refugee camp here in jordan that is so large, it is now the fifth largest city in jordan. and he said that giv
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